The perfect dumpling for when …

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Cooking with Adam Liaw airs weekday evenings on SBS Food at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m., or stream for free on SBS On Demand. Watch the Dumplings episode on Friday, October 15. —

You’re not feeling well: wonton soup

In Shanghai, wontons are part of what could be the city’s favorite breakfast. A light broth (sometimes just the starchy water in which the wontons were cooked) is flavored with a little sesame oil, scallion, and pepper, and acts like a soup to contain delicious wontons filled with pork and pork. green vegetables. His hot broth – along with any added fat and spices – make it a great remedy when you’re feeling unwell.

You want to celebrate: Shui jiao (basic boiled dumplings)

These dumplings are small pieces of minced meat and vegetables wrapped in a thin piece of dough. They can be round or crescent shaped, boiled, steamed or fried, and are one of the main foods prepared for the Chinese New Year. Their shape resembles gold bars, which symbolize wealth. This recipe makes a fair amount of pork meatballs, but they can be frozen for those cheeky late-night snacks.

You want something without meat: Ravioli with spinach and water chestnuts

One of Hong Kong’s most versatile foods, this vegan and vegetarian steamed dumpling recipe is ideal when you’re looking for something light and full of texture.

You need a little solace: Sujebi (Korean potato and dumpling soup)

This Korean dish is a hand-torn noodle potato soup that is soft and chewy that is both comforting and healthy. The broth is rich in umami flavor, and chef Billy Law calls it the “Korean minestrone”.

Want the perfect Friday night in: Spinach Ricotta Ravioli with Passata

Ravioli are Italian ravioli, usually stuffed with ricotta, meat, cheese, and vegetables. The filling is then sealed in the dough and served with a delicious tomato or cream based pasta sauce. In ancient Italy, these little dumplings were served every Friday – make this recipe from Rachel Khoo the perfect dish to end the week.

You feel lonely: Manti (Turkish dumplings)

In Turkish culture, this dish usually needs several hands. Teamwork is absolutely essential if you plan to do manti for a large group of guests, so invite your friends over and approach it together. They say the sign of a good mantis is their small size, and although Shane Delia’s mantis are larger than a traditional dumpling, they are still delicious!

You want to surprise and delight: Xiao Long Bao (Soup balls)

The history of this dumpling begins in Nanxiang, Shanghai almost 150 years ago. We think that restaurateur Huang Mingxian wanted to create a dumpling that would surprise and delight his guests. It is usually filled with pork and aspic (jellied meat broth). When cooked, the aspic melts, forming a “soup” in the dumpling. With this recipe, the soup comes from the melted bone marrow.


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