How Front-of-Package Labeling Can Increase Whole Grain Consumption

When nutrient profiling systems work well, they help direct shoppers to products that contribute to an overall diet more closely aligned with dietary recommendations. However, not all nutrient profiling systems are created equal and many neglect whole grains entirely.

We choose all the foods we eat for a wide variety of reasons – our familiarity with the food, our level of comfort with preparing the food, our perceptions of how it will taste and nourish us, our particular preferences and restrictions we may have due to health conditions or allergies. We also choose foods in content where certain rules and regulations exist to ensure transparency for us as consumers, and sometimes, to nudge us toward healthier choices. For example, in the United States, all food packaging must display accurate nutrition labels and ingredient lists, and health claims made on packaging are strictly regulated.

In recent years, there has been a strong worldwide trend towards the use of nutrient profiling systems which indicate some of the nutritional attributes of a product on the front of the package or use an algorithm to classify a product as belonging to a healthy or unhealthy food category. . When these systems work well, they can help guide shoppers to products that contribute to an overall diet more closely aligned with Dietary Guidelines recommendations – a diet that limits total calories, saturated fat, added sugars and sugar. sodium, while encouraging increased consumption of foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts. However, not all nutrient profiling systems are created equal and many neglect whole grains entirely, despite the fact that whole grains are very well recognized for their health benefits and feature in most dietary recommendations. worldwide.

To read the rest of the story, visit: Whole Grains Council

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